Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Friday Hot Links

Friday, April 29th, 2016

Happy Friday! Might we suggest recent art, design, and culture goodies shared by the SVACE faculty and community?

Image via Hyperallergic

Image via Hyperallergic

Protest Projection (Hyperallergic): Artist activists illuminate the Guggenheim’s impasse over migrant workers’  rights. (via Robert Stribley)

Hello Dolly (CNET): Drone photography recreates Alfred Hitchcock’s “dolly zoom” technique. (via SVA MFA Visual Narrative)

Mini Museum (Print Mag): Tribeca treated to a museum in an elevator. (via Steven Heller)

Branding Brew (FastCo. Design): Design titan Milton Glaser has branded Brooklyn Brewery since it began. (via SVA News)

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The Armory Show 2016

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

The Armory Show is back, now in its 22nd year.  This year, the fair will feature 205 galleries from 36 countries worldwide. Here are a few highlights from our visit.

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Visit our Instagram for more updates from Armory Week 2016!

Get THE MET?

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

The Met’s new logo has inspired divergent criticism from the art and design press. It’s a “graphic misfire,” writes Vulture, while WIRED explains how its ligatures create “a metaphorical moment.” The capital E’s “look like butts,” quips GQ.

To build our own informed opinion of the logo, we sought answers from Ilene Strizver, a longtime SVACE faculty member who teaches Gourmet Typography.  She also writes TypeTalk, an ongoing and deeply informative blog for CreativePro.com. Ilene responded with some valuable insights. She writes:

The New Met Logo
Ilene Strizver | The Type Studio

The new Metropolitan Museum of Art logo has everyone talking – and it’s not all words of praise. The new logo is the work of global-branding firm Wolff Olins, scheduled to be unveiled on March 2016. This design is a rebranding, with a totally new look, feel, and concept compared to the previous logo. While there is certainly nothing wrong with rebranding a highly revered institution such as The Met, I’m not sure this one accomplishes what they set out to do.

Old and new logos for The Met

Old and new logos for The Met

At first glance, the connection the new logo has with the overly tight type treatments of the 60s and 70s was unmistakable. This style was first employed by Herb Lubalin, who started the whole tight type movement during the transition from metal to phototypesetting which made it possible to do things that were not viable with hot metal. Lubalin was known for his extremely tight spacing and type tailoring (as we called it then), where two or more characters were often blended into each other, creating a ligature of sorts. The new Met logo uses this technique to create extreme ligatures out of each of the three-letter words. Unfortunately it is overdone to the point where the ‘tricks’ catch the eye and take visual precedence over the meaning of the words and the great institution it represents, in effect reverting back to the “bellbottoms and tie-dye shirts” of typography of the 60s and 70s.

This cover of U&lc Vol 5, No 4 was designed by Herb Lubalin in 1978. It epitomizes the overly tight type that was the revered style of the 60s and 70s.

This cover of U&lc Vol 5, No 4 was designed by Herb Lubalin in 1978. It epitomizes the overly tight type that was the revered style of the 60s and 70s.

“Our new logo no longer relies on symbols and, instead, is based on our commonly used name ‘The Met,’ which has an immediacy that speaks to all audiences. It is an original drawing, a hybrid that combines and connects serif and sans serif, classical and modern letterforms. In this respect, it reflects the scope of the Museum’s collection and the inherent connections that exist within it.”

This statement by the museum explains that the hybrid forms are intended to symbolize the broad scope of the museum’s collection. Unfortunately the logo doesn’t ‘read’ that way. If the viewer needs an explanation in order to ‘get’ or understand a logo that is not easily recognizable, it is missing the point.

Both revising or rebranding a logo should take an identity in forward-moving direction, but this does not do that. It is a caricature of a style gone by, and does not accurately reflect the greatness and broad spectrum of the institution it is designed to represent. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for finessing and type tailoring typography to either draw attention to words or letterforms (having lovingly created many in my days working on U&lc), but going overboard with too many tricks makes the tricks the star attraction, not the word mark or the institution itself. If this logo consisted of these same letterforms without the ‘triple-ligaturization’ it might have been more successful in achieving the intended goal.

-Ilene Strizver

Friday Hot Links

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

Happy Friday! We want to share some art, design, and culture goodies shared by the SVACE faculty and community. To celebrate the Sundance Film Festival, this week’s edition covers film and video.

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Herzog at Sundance (Creativity Online): A cybersecurity brand produces, Herzog directs. (via Mark Burk)

Indie or Die (Variety): Sundance and the hopes for indie film. (via SVA MFA Visual Narrative)

It Gets Real (WIRED): Google Cardboard adds convincing 3D spatial audio. (via Robert Stribley)

Oscars So White (Entertainment Weekly): Do structural problems keep minorities out of the Oscars? (via Steve Brodner)

Help Desk

Saturday, January 23rd, 2016

Today’s guest blogger is Eric Sutphin, Residency Coordinator of SVA’s Summer Residency Programs:

It is a fact that pursuing a career in the arts comes with a wealth of anxieties. Art schools may offer students top-of-the-line facilities, renowned faculty, a marketable pedigree and an invaluable network, but a complaint that I have often heard (and have launched myself) is the deficit in practical training for art students at the beginnings of their careers.  The attendant ambiguity that comes with a life in art can seem daunting and alienating; how often have we been to an opening and looked around at the dealers, curators and artists, and thought, “Wow, these people really have it figured out, they’ve all made it.”

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SVA’s Keren Moscovitch (r) in “Help Desk: Equity Exchange Marathon” at Equity Gallery

Help Desk: Equity Exchange Marathon was a performance event conceived and launched by multidisciplinary artist Ofri Cnaani, a current faculty member of SVA’s Continuing Education and Summer Residency Programs. The performance took place at the Artists Equity brick-and-mortar space, Equity Gallery, located in New York’s Lower East Side. Cnaani invited eight guests (most were arts professionals) to respond to questions submitted via Artists Equity’s online platform. Over the course of the performance, which was structured like a professional practices “clinic” and free and open to the public, the spirit of  generosity and an enactment of a kind of utopian sharing economy unfolded. A few of my personal highlights from the event are below:

Q: How do I navigate being an artist, critic curator?
A: Gean Moreno, Artistic Director of Cannonball Miami: “Why is this still a problem within art? It’s seems like a kind of masochistic line that we have gotten comfortable with as artists. In other disciplines, people often move freely between roles. Don’t  worry about it, just do it.”

Q: “Are studio visits worth it?”
A: Joey Lico, curator and Director of Programming at The Cultivist: “Yes!” People who visit your studio generally want others to succeed, so invite people who are interested in your work to visit. But be prepared, and show everything you have, even the things you have hidden away, turned against the wall. We want to see everything. Be careful of those people who want to just sit around and hang out with artists; they’re out there.”

Ofri Cnaani (center) listens at "Help Desk: Equity Exchange Marathon" at Equity Gallery

Ofri Cnaani (center) listens at “Help Desk: Equity Exchange Marathon” at Equity Gallery

The question of the livability of cities came up frequently. Leila Bozorg, Chief of Staff for the NYC Dept. of Housing and Preservation and Development noted that “It is a city’s responsibility to make accommodations for cultural producers. It’s what keeps neighborhoods and cities, in general, attractive places to live.”

As each respondent answered the questions (which were written on index cards), he or she put the card on a clear table under which a projector beamed the image of the amassed question cards onto a nearby wall. The ephemera from the performance is included in Cnaani’s solo exhibition File Under:?, on view at Equity Gallery through January 30, 2016. Additionally, the answers to the artists’ questions will be “transcribed, processed and made available through Artists Equity’s website as a service for the art community.”

Help Desk: Equity Exchange Marathon at Equity Gallery

Help Desk: Equity Exchange Marathon at Equity Gallery