Posts Tagged ‘Timothy Hull’

Ruined In a Day

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

Last fall, BAM called for entries to an competition for public art projects to commemorate the institution’s 150th Anniversary.  The BAMart Public Art Project “aimed at enlivening BAM’s campus and its surrounding district through the commission of five distinctive works from emerging and established artists.”

BAMart: Public selected locations within walking distance of the Peter Jay Sharp Building, each of which featured blank walls or open plots.  “Utilizing unused space allows for BAM to support artists and to infuse more life and creativity into the community,” says Dave Harper, BAMart curator and member of the curatorial committee. “This project’s goal is to inspire the collective public imagination.”

From over one hundred proposals, the committee selected four artists or artist groups.  They include Glen Baldridge, Ed Purver, Showpaper, and Timothy Hull & Future Expansion Architects.  It is the last group whose project interests me the most.

Nicholas McDermott (l) and Timothy Hull (r)

Timothy Hull & Future Expansion Architects (Nicholas and Deirdre McDermott) produced Accelerated Ruin, a sculpture that “undergoes an uncontrolled decomposition.”  The structure, roughly 20 feet tall at the highest high and 40 feet long is couched between neighboring buildings and looks like a monument parked by an ancient culture.  It is clad in a soluble, biodegradable shell that will break down throughout the coming year, which will reveal a skeletal armature of white-tipped aluminum tubes.  (You can review the construction and proposals here and here.)

Ecovative Design, LLC produces this material, ordinarily an organic packing substance grown from agricultural waste and fungal mycelium. (At the opening, many jokes circulated about a fortress made from hemp and mushrooms. “Imagine the giant brownies you could make!”)  The material feels like styrofoam or a dry sponge, but smells like fresh hay.  The surface seems like weathered, then glazed stone or even severely corroded bronze.  It can be very dense or arid enough to break over one’s knee.

How Tactile of You: Ecovative surface

Accelerated Ruin is important because it offers a dynamic, rather than static, public art project that encourages multiple visits.  One can imagine the changes in store. Will a tropical storm wipe out huge chunks at once?  Will grass and weeds grow from the seams?  Will birds nest inside?  It is also important as an example of artistic practice beginning to explore and consider environmental impact.  Michael Wang’s Carbon Copies last winter at Foxy Production comes to mind.  For that show, “each sculpture was made out of carbon and its dimensions were determined by the amount of CO2 that was emitted to create a certain artwork, the appearance of which was reflected by details in the sculpture.  So, one of the big ones was based on Richard Serra Torqued Ellipse and it was a cube with a torqued ellipse cut out of the middle.” -from Brian Droitcour’s Yelp review of Foxy Production

Brooklyn Sphinx

If you don’t go in for the “sustainable” angle, then consider artists adopting variations on this everyday petrochemical stuff.  For example, Dan Graham’s Foams might corral this territory, while Jason Rhoades would take it full retard with his signature PeaRoeFoam: whole green peas, white virgin beaded foam and fish bait styled salmon eggs.  But imagining the latter roasting in this week’s weather makes me appreciate Accelerated Ruin even more.

Fun From Rear: with the lot locked, this view will be out of reach

 

Nu MUSEO

Thursday, July 16th, 2009
KS: I’m struck by your commitment to rendering blood on the print exactly the way blood would spurt, or in the case of the vinyl floor piece, as if a body has been dragged across it. And in fact, a body will be literally dragged across it.
That’s Katie Sonnenborn talking to RObert Lazzarini in the new issue of MUSEO about his new bloodstained wallpaper prints.  The prints are the result of Lazzarini’s visual arts fellowship at the Neiman Center for Print Studies at Columbia University.  “The deathly object is something that I think about quite a lot,” he says.  Katie asks him about this preoccupation, but Lazzarini seems more interested in formal issues.  That’s fine, for now.  It is interesting to hear him explain the decisions behind his current show at the Aldrich Museum.
We also get great interviews with Shana Moulton, and with Roxy Paine, whose giant aluminum environmental sculptures must have a great tan after laying out in Madison Square Park, and then migrating to the roof at the Met.
And the great innovation of the new MUSEO is a site-specific project curated by the marvelous Timothy Hull, artist and egyptologist, and MUSEO honcho David Shapiro.  From the curators:
“For this project, artists were asked to create “screen captures” of images using their desk-top as a substrate. It is reasonable to assume that many artists have multiple folders, images, screen wallpapers and open windows on their desktop at any given time. These ephemera of the desktop can either be functional, aesthetic, or both- constantly changing and shifting in meaning and intent as well as position. The screen capture (screen cap) is a tableau of a particular moment in time- on a very private medium: the personal computer. The purpose of this project is to either gain insight into the private, ad-hoc composition of a desktop or to push the boundaries of the discursive arrangement of images and other digital ephemera on the desktop as composed specifically by the artist.”
Fifteen artists submitted screenshots of their computers.  We get behind the scenes to see layers of windows, desktop backgrounds, google search results, and dazzling Photoshop abstractions.
Are they photographs?  But there is no object for light to sculpt.  Collage?  They are layered, but “collage” is etymologically obligated to pasting or gluing, neither of which happened here.  Maybe performance?  Process?  I like Devon Costello’s ersatz Kandinskys, Robert Melee’s couch potato, and Jimmy Joe Roche’s multimedia terrordome.

Robert Longo, The Ascension (for Glenn Branca album), 1981
Robert Longo, The Ascension (for Glenn Branca album), 1981

KS: I’m struck by your commitment to rendering blood on the print exactly the way blood would spurt, or in the case of the vinyl floor piece, as if a body has been dragged across it. And in fact, a body will be literally dragged across it.

Robert Lazzarini, blood on wallpaper (blue gingham), 2008
Robert Lazzarini, blood on wallpaper (blue gingham), 2008

That’s Katie Sonnenborn talking to Robert Lazzarini in the new issue of MUSEO about his new bloodstained wallpaper prints.  He made them during his visual arts fellowship at the Neiman Center for Print Studies at Columbia University.

“The deathly object is something that I think about quite a lot,” he says.  Katie asks him about this preoccupation, but Lazzarini seems more interested in formal issues.  That’s fine, for now.  It is interesting to hear him explain the decisions behind his recent exhibition at the Aldrich Museum, called Guns and Knives.

We also get great interviews with Shana Moulton, and with Roxy Paine, whose giant aluminum environmental sculptures must have a great tan after laying out in Madison Square Park, and then migrating to the roof at the Met.  Check out Maelstrom.

And the great innovation of the new MUSEO is a site-specific project for the MUSEO website.  Open Apple Shift 3 is curated by the marvelous Timothy Hull, artist and egyptologist, and MUSEO honcho David Shapiro.  From the curators:

“For this project, artists were asked to create “screen captures” of images using their desk-top as a substrate. It is reasonable to assume that many artists have multiple folders, images, screen wallpapers and open windows on their desktop at any given time. These ephemera of the desktop can either be functional, aesthetic, or both- constantly changing and shifting in meaning and intent as well as position. The screen capture (screen cap) is a tableau of a particular moment in time- on a very private medium: the personal computer. The purpose of this project is to either gain insight into the private, ad-hoc composition of a desktop or to push the boundaries of the discursive arrangement of images and other digital ephemera on the desktop as composed specifically by the artist.”

Screen capture by Robert Melee
Screen capture by Robert Melee

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Fifteen artists submitted screenshots of their computers.  We get behind the scenes to see layers of windows, desktop backgrounds, google search results, and dazzling Photoshop abstractions.

Screen capture by Ben Weiner
Screen capture by Ben Weiner

Are they photographs?  But there is no object for light to sculpt.  Collage?  They are layered, but “collage” is etymologically obligated to pasting or gluing, neither of which happened here.  Maybe performance?  Process?  I like Devon Costello’s ersatz Kandinskys, Robert Melee’s couch potato, and Jimmy Joe Roche’s multimedia terrordome.

KITT to the rescue
KITT to the rescue