Posts Tagged ‘Steve Brodner’

Student Artwork Update: Jess Atkinson

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

We are pleased to present artwork by SVACE student Jess Atkinson. Jess created her work in conjunction with Steve Brodner’s Illustration course, Boosted Visual Communication.

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Illustration by Jess Atkinson

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Illustration by Jess Atkinson

See Jess Atkinson’s work in our exhibition space at 380 Second Ave until June 30! Find more of her work at her Instagram and website.

Illustration by Jess Atkinson

Illustration by Jess Atkinson

Faculty Updates

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

What have SVACE faculty members been up to? We have exciting updates from Jade Doskow, John A. Parks, Naomi Elena Ramirez, and Steve Brodner.

Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House 2012. Image © Jade Doskow

Montreal 1967 World’s Fair, “Man and His World,” Buckminster Fuller’s Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House 2012. Image © Jade Doskow

Jade Doskow is featured at Slate and Smithsonian Magazine for her Lost Utopias project. Meanwhile, her successful Kickstarter campaign raised almost $15,000 to print a Lost Utopias monograph. Of Jade’s work, Smithsonian writes, “She has photographed the remnants of visions past, the architectural wonders and landscapes that celebrated human glory and potential.”

 

John A. Parks, "Union Square," 2014. Oil on Linen, 30 x 40

John A. Parks, “Union Square,” 2014. Oil on Linen, 30 x 40

John A. Parks was interviewed at Artists Network on the topic of painting New York City. Drawing from years of teaching wisdom, John observes that painting is “perceptual training, not the acquiring of a manual skill.” See our review of John’s recent solo show in Chelsea.

Naomi Elena Ramirez, "Detail of Choreography for Smartphone Gestures (score for solo performer)," 2016,

Naomi Elena Ramirez, “Detail of Choreography for Smartphone Gestures (score for solo performer),” 2016,

Naomi Elena Ramirez, a faculty member and alum of our Residency Programs, is a 2016-2017 A.I.R. Fellow.  The Fellowship is for underrepresented and emerging self-identified women artists and includes mentoring, professional development, and exhibition opportunities at A.I.R. Gallery. Naomi’s exhibition will open in July 2017. And more recently, her video, I Love You, was featured at Mountain Gallery in Bushwick.

 

Steve Brodner for the Boston Globe

Steve Brodner for the Boston Globe

Steve Brodner continues to chronicle the 2016 Presidential Election with his insightful illustrations. For the Boston Globe, he proposes a running mate and cabinets for Donald Trump. Are Brodner’s fictions any stranger than the truths?

See more updates on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages!

 

Faculty Updates

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

What have SVACE faculty members been up to? We have exciting updates from Dina KantorSteve BrodnerMatt Rota, and Grant Shaffer!

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Natasha Chuk, “Vanishing Points” (l); Dina Kantor, “Water Tower, Treece, KS,” 2012 (r)

Dina Kantor converses with arts writer Natasha Chuk on Feb 15, to discuss the themes of Chuk’s recently published book Vanishing Points, and Kantor’s images from the series Treece, which are featured in the book. This event is free and open to the public, hosted by MFA Photo, Video and Related Media and Visual and Critical Studies.

"Presidents" by Steve Brodner

“Presidents” by Steve Brodner

Steve Brodner will speak at the Norman Rockwell Museum on Feb 19. He will discuss Presidents, his new book in progress, which will explore the significant events of the administrations of president William McKinley to the present.

Matt Rota at Society of Illustrators

Matt Rota at Society of Illustrators

Matt Rota won a Silver Medal for the Editorial Category from the Society of Illustrators for his illustrations for ProPublica. At the reception, he gave a brief speech about his work. Read our interview with Matt about his book here.

Image: Grant Shaffer

Image: Grant Shaffer

Grant Shaffer illustrated Three Magic Balloonsa children’s book presented by Juliana Marguiles, whose father wrote it for her and her sisters when they were children. The book is slated for release in May.

See more updates on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages!

 

Faculty Updates

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

What have SVACE faculty members been up to? We have exciting updates from Tristan Elwell, Steve BrodnerJohn Parks, Kris Mukai, and Viktor Koen!

DJ Khaled by Tristan Elwell

DJ Khaled by Tristan Elwell for the Miami New Times

Tristan Elwell produced a hilarious illustration for a Miami New Times story about celebrity DJ Khaled. The image combines Khaled’s likeness with the emoji that Khaled has adopted to his brand vernacular.

Steve Brodner for The Boston Globe

Steve Brodner for The Boston Globe

Steve Brodner illustrated Ted Cruz has always been right for The Boston Globe, documenting episodes in the history of this arch-conservative presidential contender.

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John Parks, “Garden with Landscape,” 2005

See Garden with Soldier (2005), a painting by John Parks, in Winter Salon at 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel, on view until Feb 22!

Illustration by Kris Mukai

Illustration by Kris Mukai

Kris Mukai is featured on DART: Design Arts Daily, where she comments on brushes, blogs, and self-publishing.

Viktor Koen (l) hard at work with Marshall Arisman (r)

Viktor Koen (l) hard at work with Marshall Arisman (r) via @svamfaillustration Instagram

Viktor Koen curated Gone, a group exhibition of work by members of the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay class of 2017. Gone is on view Feb 6-March 3.

See more updates on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages!

Lost in Translation

Sunday, January 17th, 2016

The cartoonist group Charlie Hebdo provoked outrage last week by publishing a cartoon that shockingly resurrects a dead child refugee as an adult sexual predator.  Journalists responded: “Disgustingly racist.” “Unforgivable.”

How do we interpret this cartoon? Is it aggressive satire that mocks European xenophobia? Or do we take it at face value, as racist propaganda? Which interpretation is easier to believe? Do we expect the worst of our cartoonists, just as natives expect the worst of immigrants?

Steve Brodner, an illustration faculty member, agreed to share some insights. Along with practicing some of today’s most pointed political cartooning, Steve has spoken publicly about Charlie Hebdo with fellow artist Liniers  and SVA colleagues. On January 22, he will participate in Freedom of Expression in a Changing World: What Cannot Be Said. If there’s an illustrator whose own work and teaching experience who can illuminate the Charlie Hebdo debate, it has to be Steve.

Charlie Hebdo's Aylan Kurdi cartoon

Charlie Hebdo’s Aylan Kurdi cartoon

Steve writes:

“Here is the latest cartoon from the Charlie Hebdo controversy factory to whip across the news this week. It implies that the famous baby, Aylan Kurdi, who horrendously perished in one of the recent waves of Syrian migration (which are ongoing, so please contribute to UNHCR or others), would grow up to become a drooling rapist marauding across the streets of Cologne.

What are we to make of it? Are we to assume that the cartoonist and editor, both in league with the racist right of Europe and the United States, believe that the behavior of these particular people on New Year’s Eve should be seen as an accurate characterization of Muslim men in general? Or is this a broader commentary, via irony, on the way we so quickly revert to black and white thinking when we see such a story?

I knew one of the Hebdo artists murdered in January 2015. There is an undoubted level of sophistication that they share. And I believe that this sophistication is cleverly woven via irony into the Charlie ‘toons.

It should be said that it is the hard fought-for goal of all illustration to be, on some level, understood by the viewer. What we do is fine-tuned for communication. That is my training and what I teach at SVA. But how to judge a project where ambiguity is the goal?

Could it then just be about raising hell? And it does raise hell. So shall we talk about that instead? That this all is rewarded in the coin of the realm: attention. Great attention will be paid to this cartoon. And not incidentally to…Charlie Hebdo.

Here in the US we have, for the first time, a European-style hate campaign looking very much like it will take over a major political party. It would seem now that poor, muddled satire needs to be put away.  Mass communication is about driving that out. If the statement as written here, that Aylan would have grown up to be a sexual abuser, is to be taken at face value, it would be just another racist tract. And a pretty tasteless one.

I believe the statement intended is mocking of racists in France and in the West. But whichever it is, it is impossible to discern, and is therefore a failure. Which we are all entitled to have from time to time.  But don’t pretend that syntax and usage are not important in visual communication. They are everything.”