Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Bushwick Beat

Thursday, April 27th, 2017

On this segment of Bushwick Beat, we stayed close to the Jefferson stop on the L train, visiting group shows at TransmitterSchema Projects, and Sardine.

At Transmitter, a group show titled “Photo II” ran the gamut of photographic practices, from bizarre portraiture and still life to architectural abstraction.

Erin O'Keefe at Transmitter

Erin O’Keefe at Transmitter

The work of Erin O’Keefe was immediately arresting for its bold color and solid form. After the initial read, however, the status of the work as a photograph quickly came into question. With unreliable space, gradients, and shadows that seem too sharp, these images reveled in their ambiguous status, blurring the distinction between documenting real space and creating an artificial image.

Eli Durst at Transmitter

Eli Durst at Transmitter

Showing off an equally bold sense of form, the photographs of Eli Durst explored a deadpan surrealism that thrived in the harsh contrasts of black and white. A particularly striking image casts an apple against the reflective light of a table. The sharp and exaggerated shadow becomes a tangible form as the table fades into a blurred white.  With a minimum of manipulation and by simply harnessing the textures of things, Durst’s photographs become a light show of the weird mis-recognitions in the act of seeing, of visions that refuse to relay and stay stubbornly inert.

Irina Rozovsky at Transmitter

Irina Rozovsky at Transmitter

Irina Rozovsky’s work shared the high key visual intensity of O’Keefe’s images as well as the surreality of Durst’s photos, contrasting the austere composure of those artists with a fragile vibrancy of broken, complex things. As a result, her photos felt more documentary in nature, less focused on the artifice of the photographic eye than the makeshift enigmas found in the world.

At Schema Projects, “Archetypewriters” was a group show organized by ROE Projects, focusing on small drawings that used systems and patterns and suggested a kinship with writing. As a bonus, most artists also shared a love of vibrant color.

"Archetypewriters" at Schema Projects

“Archetypewriters” at Schema Projects

The drawings were tightly hung along eye level, with dozens of works by the eight featured artists. All of the pieces were engrossing, whether for the simple visual power of neon markers, the precision of a lace-work pattern, or the indecipherable rules that set a given work in motion. For this visual eclecticism, “Archetypewriters” managed to be one of the most visually impressive shows we had seen in Bushwick in a long while.

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Butt Johnson in “Archetypewriters” at Schema Projects

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“Process +/- Pattern” at Sardine Gallery

Finally, we visited Sardine gallery, where “Process +/- Pattern” put five artists together along the theme of process and pattern. In contrast to “Archetypewriters” and “Photo II,” this show featured work that did not immediately speak in unison, and varied considerably in medium and approach.

A video display of a self-erasing page of the Old Testament by Willum Geerts

Willum Geerts in “Process +/- Pattern” at Sardine Gallery

A video display of a self-erasing page of the Old Testament by Willum Geerts sat alongside a pattern drawing and paintings by Keigo Takahashi and Shane Drinkwater. A Tatlin-esque wall sculpture by Karen Tepaz was hung next to a woven work by Heidi Hankaniemi. The broad themes of the show invited this extreme variety; and while “Process +/- Pattern” proved less focused than the two earlier shows, it was a welcome abandon of their principled approach to medium.  The focus was instead what these objects shared despite their disparity – a commitment by each artwork to be what it was, whether followed through by the rule of pattern or discovered in the process along the way.

-Will Patterson

Weekend Hot Links

Friday, April 14th, 2017

Happy Friday! Get creative this weekend with recent art, design, and culture stories shared by the SVACE faculty and community.

Radical Women (The Cut): The Brooklyn Museum honors the work of black feminist artists. (via SVA News)

(via SVA MFA Visual Narrative)

(via Robert Stribley)

(via SVA News)

Color Code (FastCo. Design): Explore Le Corbusier’s color harmonies, in spaces and your mind. (via SVA Products of Design)

(via Mark Burk)

Viva Italia (Curbed): See Italy’s rich graphic design history celebrated in this new website. (via Jess Mackta)

Right Swipe (Newsweek): The plot to paper college campuses with racist posters. (via Steven Heller)

See more updates and stories on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages.

Student Artwork Update: Gregory Mayes

Wednesday, April 5th, 2017

We are pleased to present photographs by SVACE student Gregory Mayes! Gregory created this artwork in conjunction with the course, Digital Photography I.

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Gregory writes: “I had a realization not long ago while walking the streets of New York – my view of the world had shrunk to a corridor ten feet wide and one story high. I paused a moment to expand my gaze, taking in the vibrant details of urban life that I had allowed to become mundane. It is these details perceived in our periphery – a flicker of reflection, movement of shadow or burst of color – which reaffirm the authenticity of our reality.”

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

“I have attempted to capture these details through this series of photographs. To remove them from context and separate into the basic elements of shape, line and color. To transform into something only seen by our subconscious.”

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

“New York is a city with an enormous gravitational pull – it beckoned me almost five years ago. It draws people from around the world, many wishing to practice alchemy on themselves. It was the same for me, a transmutation that is still taking form. I intend to make gold of that.”

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

See Gregory’s work in our exhibition space at 209 East 23rd Street, until April 30!

Student Artwork Update: Nivia Hernandez

Monday, April 3rd, 2017

We are pleased to present photographs by SVACE student Nivia Hernandez! Nivia created this artwork in conjunction with the course, Digital Photography I.

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

Nivia writes: “From a very young age, we are taught to hold on to things and/or people that bring us comfort, but as we grow and experience pleasure, pain, and loss we may learn to let go and appreciate the simple things in life. Through these photographs, the subjects I have observed and engaged with express in a simple form that letting go, being still, and appreciating the given moment is a path to vibrant happiness, comfort and freedom.”

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

See Nivia’s work in our exhibition space at 380 Second Avenue, 8th floor, until May 31! Find more at Nivia’s website and Instagram.

Weekend Hot Links

Friday, March 10th, 2017

Happy Friday! Beat the snow today with recent art, design, and culture stories shared by the SVACE faculty and community.

Image via Fast Co. Design

Image via Fast Co. Design

Government Graphics (Fast Co. Design): How Nixon “got” design. (via SVA News)

Opie’s Others (New Yorker): What Catherine Opie’s photos say about Los Angeles and queerness. (via SVA BFA Photography)

Truth Tellers (Adweek): Animation and journalism take on the fake news world.  (via Mark Burk)

Kings of Limbs (Atlas Obscura): Arms and legs and eyes and ears and genitals, oh my! (via SVA MFA Visual Narrative)

See more updates and stories on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages.