Posts Tagged ‘Comics’

Friday Hot Links

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Happy Friday! We want to share some interesting articles and stories shared online by the SVACE faculty and community.


Peace for Paris (ADWEEK): Artist Jean Jullien and Steven Heller on the power of symbols. (via Robert Stribley)

Rap Tees (New York Times): A new book documents the design and ideas of hip-hop T-shirts. (via Kevin Brainard)

Gotham Genealogy (Nerdist): Watch this video evolution of Batman’s territory. (via MFA Visual Narrative)


Friday Hot Links

Friday, October 9th, 2015

Happy Friday! We want to share some interesting articles and stories shared online by the SVACE faculty and community.


Best American Comics (NY Daily News): A printed cartoon museum featuring 37 artists in 10 chapters.  (via MFA Visual Narrative)

Happy Medium (via It’s Nice That): Geometric planes enliven Medium’s new identity. (via Kevin Brainard)

A Font Grows in Brooklyn (Print Magazine): A type designer crowdfunds a Bushwick typeface. (via Steven Heller)


What’s What at NYCC?

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

New York Comic Con is here! Attracting more than 150,000 fans, NYCC is the East Coast’s biggest pop culture convention – and the second largest event in NYC!

Not a bad place to be in line

Some lines are better than others

Four days long, NYCC comprises comics, video games, toys, movies, and TV. Panels and signings bring together fans and creators. Screenings tease viewers with previews of anticipated movie and TV premieres. And artists get to showcase original artwork and recent publications.  And then there are the costumes… (See the SVACE blog coverage from 2014!)

Faced with hundreds of events, how does an unguided visitor decide what to attend? We asked Ben Zackheim, faculty member of MFA Visual Narrative, to handpick the most promising NYCC offerings. Ben’s suggestions will appeal to fans with a keen interest in drawing or writing comics:


Show and Tell!

Hip-Hop & Comics: Cultures Combining (Thursday): How do Hip-hop and comics reflect each other?

Breaking into Comics the Marvel Way (Thursday): What kind of talent is Marvel seeking?

DC Comics – Master Class: Art History (Thursday): What’s it like to draw for DC?

Storytelling on the Page (Friday): How do writers structure a complete issue from beginning to end?

Comics 101: Where to Begin? (Friday): Need a comics sherpa?

ComiXology Submit: The Future of Self-Publishing (Saturday): What can ComiXology do for you?

Truthiness is Stranger than Fiction: New Reality-Based Graphic Novels (Saturday): Can comics handle “the truth?”

The Future of Comics for Children and Young Adults (Sunday): What does the future hold for #kidlit comics and graphic novels?

It's Raining Deadpools

It’s Raining Deadpools

And while you visit, be sure to visit Nathan Fox and MFA Visual Narrative at Artist Alley!

See you there!

See you there!

Friday Hot Links

Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Happy Friday! We want to share some interesting articles and stories shared online by the SVACE faculty and community.

Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 10.58.31 AM

A Bug’s Death (via Adweek): Volkswagen’s deception undoes generations of great ads. (via Kevin Brainard)

Tinybop for Tots (WIRED): A new app for kids uses stunning illustrations and physics-based animation to encourage Earth exploration. (via MFA Visual Narrative)

Mexico’s Monarch (Print Magazine): Peter Kuper discusses Ruins, his opus graphic novel about Oaxaca, Mexico. (via Steven Heller)


Pros and Con

Friday, October 10th, 2014

New York Comic Con is the mega-spectacle now under way at the Javits Center.  It’s the biggest pop culture convention in the East Coast and second biggest nationwide. Last year, it attracted more than 133,000 fans (Armory Show: 65,000; People’s Climate March: 300,000).


New York Comic Con at the Javits Center

Visitors pay $65 for a three-day ticket or $35-50 dollars for one day, making admission comparable to the Frieze Art Fair.  (Unlike Frieze, NYCC issues high-tech Radio Frequency Identification Badges containing unique microchips. By “activating” this badge, badge holders permit NYCC to track them – or with the flip of a switch, incinerate them.)


The Dark Horse Comics stable

Most NYCC exhibitors come from the worlds of comics, animation, gaming, toys, movies, TV, and publishing.  A tight schedule of daily panels, autograph sessions, portfolio reviews, and sneak preview screenings can bring fans closer to their favorite creators and projects.  On top of all that, NYCC has its own beer, a DJ spinning all weekend long, and speed dating gatherings all weekend long, and that doesn’t even count the afterparties. So if you can’t get lucky at Comic Con, then maybe Sailor Moon is not the look for you.  NYCC is also part of New York Super Week, a weeklong pop culture festival that will turn NYC into “a playground for super heroes, villains, vampires, zombies, geeks and passionate fans of all sizes.”

NYCC is a great place to be an artist, and emerging illustrators can set up shop in Artist Alley, alongside the legends who inspired them.  Artists sell drawings on the spot, alongside limited edition prints and copies of their comics.


SVA’s own Nathan Fox with colleague at Artist Alley


(l-r) Artist Matt Kindt, writer Hunter Fine


Young artists at Artist Alley

But NYCC is also a branding blowout.  Some brands feel relevant, such as Wacom or Simon and Schuster, who occupy vital positions in the production and distribution of a project, but why do we need Chevy, Sprint, and Geico?  And isn’t the cross-marketing of 50-Cent and Star Wars a bit of a burden on a pair of headphones? Last year’s Frieze Art Fair partnership with Gap looks quaint, comparatively.


(l-r) Fans line up for Chevy, Azog urges you to watch his movies


(l-r) Pioneers of digital and print


Fans line up to be marketed


From Death Star to rap star

For owners of small businesses, NYCC looks like a great a place to expand their audience.  Conversely, it’s a way for aspiring creators and makers to learn more about making.  For example, there were several booths offering 3D printing machines, or animation software.


(l-r) Making prints on a 95-year-old printer at Sidekick Lab; a USS Enterprise “docking” ring at RockLove Jewelry


“This one says it’s ‘amazing.'”


“You’ll poke your eye out, kid!”


3D printing with Solidoodle


But not everyone is here to do business.  Some are here for pleasure and play.  The costume scene is incredible, setting a very high standard for Halloween ambitions, among other things.



(l-r) A very convincing Gambit; villains on vacation


“We just saved a bunch of money on our car insurance by switching to GEICO!”




Available for children’s birthday parties and bar/bat mitzvahs!


Heartbreakers taking a breather


Cuddly continuum

As seen in our original video above, some costumes are so sexy that you might reassess your childhood interest in certain heroes (or villains). But lest we forget…


Then again, some people aren’t interested in those attractions. They get their kicks on joysticks.


Having some “me” time


These couch exhibitionists played games in front of a semi-interested audience.

And despite all the radical self-expression, there are some dominant modes and styles. For example…


Go goth or go home!


svablognycc0036c Asian figurines in vitrines

NYCC feels bustling with creativity and entrepreneurial drive, and it’s full of clever wit and hilarity…


…though it’s not a laughing matter to everyone, like this “Death Dealer” sculpture:


Amidst the crowds and overstimulation, Comic Con can be overwhelming. It makes you feel crazy, or exhausted.



But the Guardians of the Comic Con are always one step ahead of you.


Even the toughest heroes need extra maintenance.