MoCCA Mecca

April 6th, 2017

Covering the MoCCA Arts Festival 2017 is our guest blogger, Tom Motley, who is an SVACE faculty member, cartoonist, and illustrator. His publications include Tragic Strip (a monthly strip in The Brooklyn Rail), The Golden Ass, The One Marvelous Thing, and contributions to the indie anthology Cartozia Tales. For this guest blog post, Tom shares insights, photos, and original artwork. 

Blutch, MoCCA guest of honor, also spoke at the New York Comics and Picture Story Symposium. Artwork: Tom Motley

At MoCCA Fest: Blutch, MoCCA guest of honor, also spoke at the New York Comics and Picture Story Symposium. Artwork: Tom Motley

Since 2002, the Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art has hosted MoCCA Arts Festival, its annual festival of indie and art comics. This year’s edition, held April 1 – 2 at the Metropolitan West event space and Ink48 Hotel, was the fifth under the stewardship of the Society of Illustrators. I’d say the quality of the programming and the work on display was as good as it’s ever been, which is to say, excellent. What greets the public is a reliably eclectic mix of talented newcomers, stalwart old masters, reputable publishers, and promising students.

At MoCCA Fest: Brace yourself, over 200 cartoonists are exhibiting amazing work. Photo: Tom Motley

At MoCCA Fest: Brace yourself, over 200 cartoonists are exhibiting amazing work. Photo: Tom Motley

Longtime SVA Continuing Education student, Van Hong, emphasized to me that the real pleasure came from shopping for small handcrafted work one would never see at a comic store. She showed me marvelous silkscreened booklets by Kim Ku among other finds. For my part, I was enchanted by Alden Viguilla’s silkscreened Lucha Libre postcards and Ken Wong’s formally rigorous Origami Comics. But really, every table seemed to have breathtaking comics, prints, and other merchandise. I didn’t chance to see anything I disliked. How many ways can one make a comic? How many styles or subjects could there be? A walk through these aisles underscores how the answers are dizzyingly infinite.

Saturday’s Cartoon Allies crew, Annette Fanzhu, Joy Li, Cyan Daly, & Amanda Erskine. Photo: Tom Motley

Saturday’s Cartoon Allies crew, Annette Fanzhu, Joy Li, Cyan Daly, & Amanda Erskine. Photo: Tom Motley

SVA alum, Yao Xiao, selling prints and her comic, Baopu. Photo: Tom Motley

SVA alum, Yao Xiao, selling prints and her comic, Baopu. Photo: Tom Motley

The influence of SVA, which began in 1947 as the Cartoonists and Illustrators School, and has been the think tank that helped birth Will Eisner’s Comics and Sequential Art, Raw magazine, and much more, permeates everything there. “This is like an SVA reunion,” Yao Xiao, SVA BFA ’13, told me. Brendan Leach, SVA MFA ’10, wondered if the school might frown that he’s working for a rival school now. Brendan is acting chair of the Masters in Illustration program at FIT. I assured him that this is precisely the point of art school– to whip young talent into shape and send them out to succeed. I trust his teachers are beaming with pride. I lost count of all the instructors and current and former SVA students I ran into from our continuing ed, undergrad, and masters programs, attending, tabling, staffing, guest speaking… SVA had tables running from Cartoon Allies & the Visual Narrative MFA, including a very active Riso lab.

SVA alum Brendan Leach waves hello from FIT. Photo: Tom Motley

SVA alum Brendan Leach waves hello from MoCCA Arts Festival. Photo: Tom Motley

There were opportunities for academic interaction, too, with strong representation from other schools near and far: Parsons, Pratt, MICA, SAW, CCS, Kutztown, Syracuse, the High School of Art & Design, and many more.

It was great to see original paintings from Drew Friedman’s (BFA ‘81) Heroes of the Comics, such as these portraits of Marie Severin and Alvin Hollingsworth. Photo: Tom Motley

Original painted portraits of Marie Severin, Alvin Hollingsworth from Drew Friedman’s (SVA BFA ‘81) “Heroes of the Comics” series. Photo: Tom Motley

But is this worth doing? At the panel “Teaching Comics Internationally,” the panelists Ben Katchor from Parsons The New School for Design, Jessica Abel from Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (and formerly of SVA), and Merav Salomon from Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Israel, expressed serious concerns about the high cost of education and the low to no pay that awaits most cartoonists. I’d offer that creative expression is a vital component of the pursuit of happiness. Many of those who work in commercial genre comics, giving life to ideas not their own, are likely no more fulfilled than workers at any other job. But those who pursue comics as literature and art enjoy the full benefit of this superior medium. Nobody at MoCCA Fest seemed to regret their hard won power of speech.

My sketch from the panel, Teaching Comics Internationally.

My sketch from the panel, Teaching Comics Internationally. Artwork: Tom Motley

Which brings us to another panel, “Covering Trump.” It can be hard to see how a lone cartoonist might move the needle in contemporary politics. Steve Brodner, perhaps our greatest living American caricaturist (and a top SVA instructor, naturally), sees his function as “rallying the troops, showing that we’re fighting a monster in a weakened state.” I was humbled to learn how Edel Rodriguez, famous creator of viral conceptual illustrations, engages in street art, dropping posters at Trump Tower and posting prints around Times Square, often with the encouragement of our local police.

SVA instructor Steve Brodner and daughter, Terry (SVA BFA ‘12). Photo: Tom Motley

SVA instructor Steve Brodner and daughter, Terry (SVA BFA ‘12). Photo: Tom Motley

These are scary times, but life must go on. At MoCCA Fest, it goes on vividly, brilliantly. I look forward to next year’s.

Francoise Mouly and Nadja Spiegelman want you to submit to the second volume of Resist!

Francoise Mouly and Nadja Spiegelman want you to submit to the second volume of Resist!

Do you love comics, graphic novels, cartooning, and illustration? Check out our upcoming course offerings, including courses by Tom Motley! See more of Tom’s work on his website, on Twitter, and on Instagram!

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Student Artwork Update: Gregory Mayes

April 5th, 2017

We are pleased to present photographs by SVACE student Gregory Mayes! Gregory created this artwork in conjunction with the course, Digital Photography I.

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Gregory writes: “I had a realization not long ago while walking the streets of New York – my view of the world had shrunk to a corridor ten feet wide and one story high. I paused a moment to expand my gaze, taking in the vibrant details of urban life that I had allowed to become mundane. It is these details perceived in our periphery – a flicker of reflection, movement of shadow or burst of color – which reaffirm the authenticity of our reality.”

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

“I have attempted to capture these details through this series of photographs. To remove them from context and separate into the basic elements of shape, line and color. To transform into something only seen by our subconscious.”

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

“New York is a city with an enormous gravitational pull – it beckoned me almost five years ago. It draws people from around the world, many wishing to practice alchemy on themselves. It was the same for me, a transmutation that is still taking form. I intend to make gold of that.”

Photo by Gregory Mayes

Photo by Gregory Mayes

See Gregory’s work in our exhibition space at 209 East 23rd Street, until April 30!

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Student Artwork Update: Nivia Hernandez

April 3rd, 2017

We are pleased to present photographs by SVACE student Nivia Hernandez! Nivia created this artwork in conjunction with the course, Digital Photography I.

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

Nivia writes: “From a very young age, we are taught to hold on to things and/or people that bring us comfort, but as we grow and experience pleasure, pain, and loss we may learn to let go and appreciate the simple things in life. Through these photographs, the subjects I have observed and engaged with express in a simple form that letting go, being still, and appreciating the given moment is a path to vibrant happiness, comfort and freedom.”

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

Photo by Nivia Hernandez

See Nivia’s work in our exhibition space at 380 Second Avenue, 8th floor, until May 31! Find more at Nivia’s website and Instagram.

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