Author Archive

Friday Hot Links

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Happy Friday! Might we suggest recent art, design, and culture goodies shared by the SVACE faculty and community?

Image by Stuart Tolley for WIRED

Image by Stuart Tolley for WIRED

Minimal Matters (WIRED): Trends in minimalist design are categorized in this new book. (via Jess Mackta)

Keith Kicks (Fashion Mag): Keith Haring iconic imagery will adorn Toms shoes. (via SVA News)

Prize Pictures (Sacramento Bee): A closer look at Jack Ohman’s Pulitzer-winning editorial cartoons. (via Steve Brodner)

See more updates and stories on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages.

Student Artwork Update: Madeline Loucas

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

We are pleased to present artwork by SVACE student Madeline Loucas! Madeline created her photos in conjunction with the course, “Photographic Identity: Artistic Self-Expression and Professional Application” with Thorsten Roth. See Madeline’s work in our exhibition space at 209 East 23rd Street until April 30!

Photo by Madeline Loucas

Photo by Madeline Loucas

See more of Madeline’s work on Instagram and Behance.

Photo by Madeline Loucas

Photo by Madeline Loucas

Friday Hot Links

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Happy Friday! Might we suggest recent art, design, and culture goodies shared by the SVACE faculty and community?

Nendo's "50 Manga Chairs"

Nendo’s “50 Manga Chairs”

Action Lines (Dezeen): Comics inspired 50 Manga Chairs by design studio Nendo. (via SVA Interior Design)

Duly Noted (Hatnote): Every edit on Wikipedia is documented through sound. (via Kevin Brainard)

Space Aged (CreativeReview): After Kickstarter success, the reissued NASA Graphics Standards Manual is now available to purchase. (via Lisa Lordi)

Good Gaming (KPBS): Games like Peacemaker can be a force for positive change. (via SVA Design for Social Innovation)

See more updates and stories on our FacebookTwitter, and Instagram pages.

Student Artwork Update: Edwin Yuan

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

We are pleased to present artwork by SVACE student Edwin Yuan. Edwin created his work in conjunction with the course, “The Business of Art: Plan Launch and Grow a creative Business” with Steve Cranford.

TIGER at SUNSET EDWIN YUAN

Edwin Yuan, “Tiger at Sunset”

See Edwin’s work in our exhibition space at 380 Second Ave until April 30!

ANTHONY & ELIOTS WEINERS EDWIN YUAN

Edwin Yuan, Anthony & Eliot’s Weiners

Find more of Edwin’s work at his website, and the online stores Threadless, Zazzle, Spoonflower, and iTunes.


Heard It First

Saturday, April 9th, 2016

Counting, noting, and making lists of people, places, and things: Elise Engler makes art focused on documentation. She has drawn the contents of women’s purses, the prizes or our tax dollars, and every block on Broadway in Manhattan. After exhibiting her Broadway drawings at Robert Henry Contemporary, she has moved on to First Radio Headline Heard of the Day, her current series of postcard-size watercolors that document major news stories from around the world. 

In between her indexical drawings, Engler teaches Visual Narrative: Ways to Tell a Story here at SVACE. And on the occasion of her 100th entry for First Radio Headline, we asked her to open up about her process and ideas.

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First Radio Headline Heard of the Day by Elise Engler

SVACE: How exactly do you carry out your First Radio Headline Project? Do you wake up to news radio?

EE: I listen to WNYC(NPR) and sometimes BBC onNPR not at consistent time, but first thing when I wake up. I choose/edit so stories aren’t repeated. (Don’t want daily Trump.) I am traveling west later this month and will tune in to local NPR and CBC stations.

SVACE: Where do you turn for reference images?

EE: I troll the internet looking for videos from lots of news sources — all over world — and take  screen shots to combine images, so I am not stealing someone else’s work.

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First Radio Headline Heard of the Day by Elise Engler

SVACE: In this series, is there a place for working not from reference images, but instead from memory or imagination?

EE: I like to use references, then there is a great deal of choosing, altering and rearranging. There is not a great deal of memory or imaginative work in my art, although I just finished an accordion book response to a friend’s published poem, and it is all memory and imagination, and quite abstract at times. It was quite challenging.

SVACE: Many of us increasingly get our news from Facebook. And even when listening to news radio, we access it through streaming internet. By working from radio news, are you consciously representing an outmoded form of technology?

EE: I am combining my own longtime and probably old-fashioned radio obsession with Internet technology and social media. If I wasn’t an artist I would like to have been a radio journalist.

SVACE: Is there something unique about news radio, which we don’t find in other news sources?

EE: I like the range and seemingly arbitrary aspect because I don’t always tune in at same time –news is local, national, global.  Perhaps the viewer and I will, after 366 days (or in fact 406 days with 40 “test’ drawings”) have a sense of the year and also what is broadcast by this particular network. (Would be different of i was listening to Fox or Pacifica or CNN.)

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First Radio Headline Heard of the Day by Elise Engler

SVACE: In that sense, your project is a time capsule. In retrospect, would you have liked to cover any previous years, specifically? Like 2008: Obama’s election? 2001: the 9/11 fallout?

EE: This year is pretty rich. But the nature of my work is that I find interest in everything and everywhere. I drew the contents of the handbags of over 70 women, always interesting; I like the mundane and the dramatic, and intimate (the women’s bags) and enormous (Antarctica.) Any year would be fine; they all have their moments.

SVACE: Does your emotional response to the news affect your work? For example, do you struggle to depict very bad news?

EE: Definitely. I don’t want to be sensationalist. I hesitate to show murders and corpses but will if that’s crucial to the story.

SVACE: Why not just choose a story with less violence?

EE: FIRST radio headline — trying to be somewhat consistent.

First Radio Headline Heard of the Day by Elise Engler

First Radio Headline Heard of the Day by Elise Engler

SVACE: Your commitment to the project partially precludes choosing your subject matter. This could be a challenge by pulling you outside comfort zones. But it could also be a relief because it gives you a starting point.  How do you adapt to this?

EE: I’m enjoying the challenge of having to figure out how to do something quite different every day. It’s different than A Year on Broadway which had the landscape/cityscape format. I also like the research aspect.

SVACE: A Year on Broadway project had the landscape/cityscape continuity, but you were drawing from a different physical place each day – a different city block. And that is much more of a social space, with noise and interruptions, than your own home. Does First Radio Headline feel more hermetic? For you, what is the ideal setting for making art?

EE: I like the range and I have always worked both on site and in my studio. Sometimes being a “fly on the wall” gives the work greater insight and dimension. The Antarctic work was started on there, finished in my studio. My tax-dollar project TAX-ONOMIES was done in my studio (researching weaponry, drawing 30,000 Iraq War casualties), while drawings done on site include my fire station drawing (everything on a fire engine), NYC Health Lab, and equipment to maintain Riverside Park.

The social media aspect makes this project a bit less hermetic as it is posted daily and I sometimes get an immediate response. The Broadway project was also about confronting my fears having had a very serious bike accident, I did it in part to embrace and appreciate the pace of my new role as a walker and also as someone who had become very skittish on the street (that sort of worked, though not completely by any means.) People generally ignored me on the street when drawing Broadway and I am very good at zoning out. When I was young, I learned to draw in part on the street, drawing people in public places like Grand Central Station and the Staten Island Ferry.

Follow Elise Engler’s First Radio Headline Heard of the Day Drawing Project on Twitter and Instagram, or see the entire project at eliseengler.com.